Gang Stalking World

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Infiltrations

The one thing Targeted Individuals have to understand is the concept of Infiltration. This means that agents, hired operatives, civillian informants, etc will try to infiltrate your organizations or your life.

I recently posted an article about Infiltration of online groups. This has been happening for some time now. Many people think if they are posting online that they will not be investigated, but there are infiltrators who try to engage posters in conversations, where they get them to say things against the government, or use talk of violence, something that might not happen without the provocateur. These individuals are on most of the popular forums, and often you won’t know who they are. You might get a sense of who they are based on their postings, but that is not always the case.

Here on some things to be aware of regarding Infiltrations.

[quote]http://www.theage.com.au/news/technology/security/police-hire-private-spies-to-snoop-online/2008/11/26/1227491580370.html

Police hire private spies to snoop online

THE Internet communications and websites of anti-war campaigners, environmentalists, animal rights activists and other protest groups are being secretly monitored by state and federal agencies.

A Melbourne private intelligence firm specialising in “open-source intelligence” has been engaged by Victoria Police, the Australian Federal Police and the federal Attorney-General’s Department to monitor and report on the protest movements’ use of the internet.

The monitoring, which has been secretly conducted for at least five years, includes exploring websites, online chat rooms, social networking sites, email lists and bulletin boards to gather information on planned demonstrations and other activities. Many of those monitored have not broken any laws, but it is believed information about their participation in online activities is conveyed to government agencies that also deal with terrorism.[/quote]

These types of infiltrations are happening all over the Internet. Sometimes the poster will just be observing gathering information and monitoring. In other cases they will perform a similar fuction to their offline components, and they will engage posters in extreme conversations about violence, anti-government sentiments, etc.

 

When J.Edgar Hoover ran the FBI, the infiltration of the KKK was about 20% infiltration. The agents that had infiltrated the FBI were often responsible for encouraging acts of violence on others, or enacting those acts of violence themselves.

The FBI kept talking with Klan members. By 1965, some 20 percent of Klan members were on the

[quote]The FBI kept talking with Klan members. By 1965, some 20 percent of Klan members were on the FBI payroll, many occupying leadership positions in seven of the fourteen Klan groups across the country, states political scientist Robert Goldstein in “Political Repression in Modern America: 1870 to the Present,” [/quote]

 

http://www.buzzle.com/editorials/3-20-2006-91543.asp

[quote]Glick lists four main methods used by the agents:
1) infiltration by agents and informers with the intention to discredit and disrupt;
2) psychological warfare from the outside, using “dirty tricks” to undermine progressive movements; 3) harassment through the legal system, making targets appear to be criminal; and
4) extralegal force and violence including break-ins, vandalism, assaults, and beatings to frighten dissidents and disrupt their movements. [/quote]
[quote]
It was COINTELPRO “that enabled the FBI and police to eliminate the leaders of mass movements in the 1960s without undermining the image of the United States as a democracy, complete with free speech and the rule of law.

“Charismatic orators and dynamic organizers were covertly attacked and ‘neutralized’ before their skills could be transferred to others and stable structures established to carry on their work.”
[/quote]

This is why new movements have a hard time getting started. The legit movements are often infiltrated, with the provocateurs, or Informants moving to the forefront of the movement.
[quote]Dr. King was a target of an elaborate COINTELPRO plot to drive him to suicide and replace him “in his role of the leadership of the Negro people” with conservative Black lawyer Samuel Pierce (later named to President Ronald Reagan’s cabinet) according to revisionist historians including Glick and Zinn, who have come to view King’s assassination, as well as Malcolm X’s, as domestic covert operations.
[/quote]

The scary part of these operations is that they will allow a movement to go forward as long as they can eventually be in control. This means that had they been successful in getting Martin Luther King Jr, to kill himself, they would have had their man already set in place to take the helm. They don’t have a problem with the movement as long as they can run the show, or have their people running the show, and their information getting out to the public.

The other thing to be aware of is that they often start groups themselves, with their own people, this way it seems like there is a movement happening, but again they are running the show.

[quote]But Glick and several other researchers argue that COINTELPRO-white appeared only to go after violent right-wing groups, and that the FBI actually gave covert aid to the Ku Klux Klan, Minutemen, Nazis, and other racist vigilantes, under the cover of being even-handed.

“These groups received substantial funds, information, and protection – and suffered only token FBI harassment – so long as they directed their violence against COINTELPRO targets,” Glick wrote.

“They were not subjected to serious disruption unless they breached this tacit understanding and attacked established business and political leaders.”

Specifically, COINTELPRO documents indicate that some infiltrators discreetly spied for years without calling attention to themselves (like the Soviet moles or sleepers) while others acted as instigators to disrupt meetings and conventions or social and other contacts.
[/quote]

Sleepers that’s a scary concept, but even as far back as Cointelpro this idea was used. To always have one of theirs at the helm, ready to take over. It’s mind boggling how this system works.
[quote]Agents spread rumors, made accusations, inflamed disagreements, and caused splits. “They urged divisive proposals, sabotaged activities, overspent scarce resources, stole funds, seduced leaders, exacerbated rivalries, caused jealousy and public embarrassment to groups. They often led activists into unnecessary danger and set them up for prosecution.”

One common maneuver, known as placing a “snitch jacket” or “bad jacket” on an activist, damaged the victim’s effectiveness and generated “confusion, distrust, and paranoia.” The maneuver was used to divert time and energy and turn co-workers against one another, even provoking violence.
[/quote]

The only thing that’s changed is that they have probably become better at their tactics, and the world at large has become less aware, or completely oblivious.
In Russia this method of dissident infiltration was also used.

http://www.aclu.org/images/asset_upload_file744_30623.pdf

[quote]
In the Stasi’s “War on Dissent,” dissenters were the most valuable informants, and the Stasi recruited heavily within the very world it was trying to destroy, employing the very people it was trying to eliminate. As a result, East German dissident-informants often paradoxically “helped the [anti-government] movement , partly simply by swelling its ranks, but also by actively working on opposition activities.”[/quote]
Governments do go after dissidents or those they are trying to eliminate. This way if they can’t eliminate the target, they will try to turn the target. So you could actively have members of a movement who are working for both sides. They are moving the movement forward with one hand, and putting it two steps back with the second hand. It’s very frustrating, because some of these people did start out as genuine activists, but at some point, they were destitute, set up, arrested, institutionalized, etc. They decided to turn informant and work for the state.

I have come across a few of these in doing this research. At first I would judge these people harshly, but now I feel sorry for some of them. Some are happy enough to sell out, but others just really don’t know what to do. They are poor, and without means and resources. This is something groups should be aware of. Someone who is a true target today, might become a turned Informant working for the state. It’s a very scary concept, but it’s again something to be aware of.

http://security.resist.ca/personal/informants.shtml
[quote]

Some types of infiltrators stay in the background and offer material support, other informants may have nothing to do with the group or action, but initially heard certain plans and tipped off the police. Among the more active types of infiltrators can be a gregarious person that quickly wins group trust. Some infiltrators will attempt to gain key forms of control, such as of communications/ secretarial, or finances. Other informants can use charm and sex to get intimate with activists, to better spy or potentially destabilize group dynamics.

Active infiltrators can also be provocateurs specializing in disruptive tactics such as sowing disorder and demoralizing meetings or demos, heightening conflicts whether they are interpersonal or about action or theory, or pushing things further with bravado and violent proposals. Infiltrators often need to build credibility; they may do this by claiming to have participated in past actions.

Also, infiltrators will try to exploit activist sensibilities regarding oppression and diversity. Intelligence organizations will send in someone who will pose as a person experiencing the common oppression of the particular activist group. For example, in the 1960’s, the Weather Underground (“Weathermen” – a white anti-imperialist armed struggle in the US) was infiltrated by an “ordinary Joe” informant with a working class image. Black war veterans were used to infiltrate the Black Panther Party. [/quote]
You will see this a lot if you visit some online or offline groups. They profile you in many cases before hand, so they think they know what triggers to use on you. The only thing you can do is profile yourself and know yourself better than they think they know you. They will try to play off of your vulnerabilities if they can find them.

 

The government also used Informants on the panthers, that’s how they knew where Fred Hampton would be, and the informant might have drugged Fred Hampton, just before the assassination.

http://www.thirdworldtraveler.com/FBI/Fed_Bureau_Intimidation.html

[quote]
In 1976, the mothers of the victims filed a civil rights suit against the FBI. The COINTELPRO files released during the trial showed that the FBI had an informant named William O’Neal in the Chicago Panthers. O’Neal was a trusted friend of Hampton and chief of security in the Chicago chapter. Taylor described, “He was the classic provocateur under COINTELPRO, always suggesting far-out violent schemes. He turned out to be the Judas who helped set up Fred Hampton’s murder”

O’Neal fed information to FBI agent Roy Mitchell, who worked closely with the Chicago Police Department’s Gang Intelligence Unit, the squad that dealt specifically with Black organizations. Days before the raid, O’Neal gave Mitchell a detailed floor plan of Hampton’s apartment that indicated where Hampton and his fiancee Akna Ajeri (who was eight months pregnant with their child at the time of the raid) usually slept.
 
Taylor also believes that there is strong evidence that O’Neal drugged Hampton on the day of the raid. Hampton’s autopsy showed a large amount of secobarbital in his system, despite the fact that he was militantly against drugs.

Hampton was shot in the head in his bed. He never even woke up. In 1982, after many appeals, the courts finally awarded survivors of the raid $1.85 million in damages. But to this day, no police or FBI agents have ever been indicted for these ruthless murders.
[/quote]
An Informant was also able to get close to Malcolm X and became one of his bodyguards.
http://www.etext.org/Politics/Buzzkill/buzzkill.7

[quote]Malcolm X as early as 1953, when the young minister for the Nation of Islam was placed on a Security Index of people top be rounded up and detained in times of “danger to national security.”  and there was at least one under cover informant present at his assassination:
Malcolm’s bodyguard Gene Roberts, who was actually an undercover cop with the New York Police Depart-ment’s Bureau of Special Services (BOSS).
[/quote]
These people in organizations have a way of rising to the top, getting into trusted positions. That is a part of the consistent M.O. that we see with Infiltrators. In researching I have not found any one surefire way of dealing with them.

The paid Infiltrators are often profiled, these are individuals that they would like to use as Informants.

http://november.org/stayinfo/breaking08/MolesWanted.html
[quote]

Carroll, who requested that his real name not be used, showed up early and waited anxiously for Swanson’s arrival. Ten minutes later, he says, a casually dressed Swanson showed up, flanked by a woman whom he introduced as FBI Special Agent Maureen E. Mazzola. For the next 20 minutes, Mazzola would do most of the talking.

“She told me that I had the perfect ‘look,'” recalls Carroll. “And that I had the perfect personality — they kept saying I was friendly and personable — for what they were looking for.”

What they were looking for, Carroll says, was an informant — someone to show up at “vegan potlucks” throughout the Twin Cities and rub shoulders with RNC protestors, schmoozing his way into their inner circles, [b]then reporting back to the FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force, a partnership between multiple federal agencies and state and local law enforcement.[/b] The effort’s primary mission, according to the Minneapolis division’s website, is to “investigate terrorist acts carried out by groups or organizations which fall within the definition of terrorist groups as set forth in the current United States Attorney General Guidelines.”

Carroll would be compensated for his efforts, but only if his involvement yielded an arrest. No exact dollar figure was offered.

“I’ll pass,” said Carroll.

For 10 more minutes, Mazzola and Swanson tried to sway him. He remained obstinate.

“Well, if you change your mind, call this number,” said Mazzola, handing him her card with her cell phone number scribbled on the back.

[/quote]

This young man was originally arrested for spray painting. (There is no way to know if he was encouraged by an Informant to perform the action.)

After he served his time for the activity, he was contacted to become an Informant, which he declined. Yet they still kept pressuring him.
http://www.stormfront.org/forum/showthread.php?t=550324

A similar scenario happened to a young man over at the Storm Front Forum. He called to find out more information about the local laws regarding Firearms in the state. A few days later he was paid a visit by the FBI. After discussing his phone call, which is what initiated the visit. He was asked to become a paid Informant to infiltrate white nationalist organizations. He was also asked to name anyone he knew who was involved in any illegal activities.

He advised that he was not aware of anyone involved in illegal activities, and that he did not wish to become an informant. Since then he has been a target of Gang Stalking, and they occasionally call him to see if he will change his mind and become an Informant, which he constantly declines.

(The best thing to do in this scenario is to get a lawyer, and give them the phone number or the card of your lawyer the next time they come calling. )

This information is from the security culture brochure. If you do get a lawyer expect even more retaliation, but it’s apparently the best method for dealing with this kind of pressure.

http://www.gangstalkingworld.com/Handbook/TheHiddenEvil.pdf
On his former website, and PDF Mark M. Rich had also mentioned that these support groups might have been infiltrated.

[quote]If you join a support group, you may also receive harassment via threads posted on message boards. Like other mediums of harassment, the topics of these threads may be about events that are unfolding in your personal life, as well as threats or insults covertly directed at you. This will probably happen repeatedly by the same person or people.

They may also employ some Gaslighting, or Jacketing tactics. Jacketing was often used during Cointelpro to make genuine activists look like informants.(10) Some internet groups which help stalking victims are heavily populated with perpetrators posing as victims.(7) Some of these perpetrators seem to be very vocal & popular members of these support groups. It seems that this a damage-control mechanism put in place to corral people, manage them to some

degree, & impede the groups’ progress. These people may also help with misdirecting events, or generally keeping groups disorganized & ineffective, under the illusion that progress is being been made.

These informants/perpetrators will give you correct information, & you may not find out until later that they’re trying to traumatize you as well. You may not be able to make other group members aware of it, as these informants may be well-respected members. It seems like a contradiction. Why would a perpetrator give you valuable information?

While I don’t know the exact answer to this question, here are some possibilities: 1.They know you would have eventually found the information anyway, so this trade-off is worth appearing genuine & gaining your trust, which may be exploited at a later date. 2.Create fear & uncertainty within you, causing you to doubt your own judgment. 3.This
may further traumatize a person with feelings of hopelessness when they learn that a very well respected group member is harassing him/her.
If you think that the people who oversee these neutralization programs have not infiltrated these groups, or even deliberately created some as a catch-net in order to disrupt & minimize progress, you are probably mistaken. The people who designed this system were not incompetent & some of these support groups seem to be just another phase
of the campaign. If you find yourself on the receiving end of repeated covert or overt criticism by one or more of these prominent victims, you can give yourself a great big pat on the back. This one of many layers in this system of control that you’ll encounter.

Also, some people who may have been genuinely trying to raise awareness, may have been bribed, blackmailed or simply tortured (Directed Energy Weapons) into becoming informants, & therefore, have been compromised. Some of the most outspoken victims & leaders in these groups appear to be deliberately operating within boundaries designed to slow progress. And, as in most social systems, there is envy, fear & jealously. If you choose to participate in one of these support groups, you may want to limit your exposure to certain people. However, although these groups are fraught with perpetrators, not all of them are. So you may still want to attend meetings & events as it will be a good opportunity to connect with other people. You will find many people who are very decent & you may even make some
new friends. Trust your own judgment.

I have been in contact with perpetrators posing as victims on the phone & via email that have hinted that I must not be genuine. It is likely that these fake victims have probably spread lies to targeted individuals indicating that I’m not really targeted since I don’t appear to be suffering or helpless. If you are raising awareness, then discrediting attempts such as these will be standard practice. It appears to be critical that they attempt to isolate you from group members who you may have a positive influence on. Once again, organizations were heavily infiltrated during Cointelpro & jacketing was used extensively.(10)
[/quote]
In his research in the PDF Mark had formerly covered the concept of Infiltrations as well. I am not sure if this is covered on the new site.
Infiltrations and organizations seem to go hand in hand. Even if you start out with a good crop of individuals, you still have the possibility of Informants infiltrating the group. They are prone to achieving high levels of trust in organizations, they can also be used for disruption and disinformation. They can even be used as sleeper cells for down the line.

With Infiltration the idea is sometimes to destroy the organization, at other times it is to ensure the state is in control of the organization, this is true offline and online. This is also true for personal infiltrations. Getting someone into your life so they are in a position of trust, which can be used later.

The idea is to not become too paranoid, because then you will not be able to function, however it’s wise to be cognizant of these Infiltrations on a personal and professional level.
http://milwaukee.indymedia.org/en/2005/08/203959.shtml

December 29, 2008 Posted by | activism, Awareness | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The final pieces of the puzzle

I was just reading up on Cointelpro and I think I have the final pieces of the puzzle put together.

It’s shiny and it squirts water, is it a water gun? No a detective that makes these things told me it was a watering stick. Describe this watering stick to me. Well you pull the trigger, and water  comes out and it can get people wet. Are you sure it’s not a water gun? No a private detective told me that it’s a watering stick, besides water guns don’t squirt blue liquid and this one does. Well Ok then, and thus Cointelpro in whatever form it choose to continue in was masked as Gang Stalking.
Since Cointelpro was only ever an American program people have been saying that it can not be Cointelpro because what is happening is International. It’s patterns are however the same, and with the new community policing programs and anti-terror laws it too has risen from the shadows where it momentarily dwelt, and has continued almost consistantly to do what it has always done. What’s been confusing is the electronic harassment and the gaslighting tactics, but enough research will show ghost tactics have been used before, including what we now know about the former East Germany. 

Recently I came across an article that I think just really helped me to put the whole thing into perspective. I think I have finally internalized it at last. I came across a story that I had not heard before. It was the story of how a young outspoken black journalist was put away by the system.
Mumia Abu-Jamal. This story starts back in the day of the black panthers, and climaxes in the early eighties and continues on to this present time. It’s a leangthy story, so I will just go over the highlights, but I suggest that you read it in full. I think after reading it, you will see a pattern that has always existed and that still exists.
http://mikeely.wordpress.com/2008/12/02/mumia-abu-jamal-enemy-of-the-state/

 

[quote]
At City Hall, Rizzo was blunt with the press: he expected them to close ranks in support of police actions. Then, from the crowded pack of reporters, a young Black journalist spoke out in the resonant tones of a radio broadcaster. He raised pointed questions about the official police story Rizzo had just laid out.

Mayor Rizzo exploded in fury and spat out a thinly veiled threat: “They believe what you write, and what you say, and it’s got to stop. And one day–and I hope it’s in my career–that you’re going to have to be held responsible and accountable for what you do.” [2]

The journalist who challenged Rizzo that day was Mumia Abu-Jamal. He had spent a decade exposing the racism of Philadelphia’s police and legal system.

On December 9, 1981, three years after this press conference, at the age of 27, Mumia Abu-Jamal fell into the hands of the police. He was shot, almost killed by a police bullet, arrested, and repeatedly brutalized in custody. And then, in a trial borrowed from Kafka or Alice’s Wonderland, he was condemned to death for the shooting of policeman Daniel Faulkner.

Mumia Abu-Jamal has not spent a day in freedom since. He is now on Death Row–defying the sterile isolation of the SCI Greene prison: writing, speaking out, and opening the eyes of a new generation to the injustices of the system.[/quote]
Like many stories his does not begin or end there, where it will end will soon be decided by a jury of his peers? Well we know that a jury will soon make a decision in regards to his fate, but let’s take you back.
Born in 1954 as Wesley Cook he grew up in the projects of Black philadelphia.

While growing up he was subjected to racism and a lot of the political unrest of that time period. He did not let that kill his spirit, infact he was able to rise above it for a time.

As a young teenager his mind was finally opened up to the true nature of the racism in his city and he joined the black pather party.

[quote]
 I was grabbed by two of them, one kicking my skull while the other kicked me in the balls. Then I looked up and saw the two-toned, gold-trimmed pant leg of a Philly cop. Without thinking, and reacting from years of brainwashing, I yelled, ‘Help, police!’ The cop saw me on the ground being beaten to a pulp, marched over briskly–and kicked me in the face. I have been thankful to that faceless cop ever since, for he kicked me straight into the Black Panther Party.”[8]

In 1969, when Mumia joined the campaign to rename his school Malcolm X High, the FBI and the Philadelphia political police squad started keeping records on him, using informants and wiretaps. In the following years, their file would grow to over 800 pages.[9][/quote]
Soon he would start to write articles and for the group and draw attention to the plight of the people in his commuity.

[quote]<b>The FBI took note, and added Mumia’s name to the ADEX index of those persons to be rounded up and interned in a national emergency.</b>[/quote]
So for people wondering if the Fema lists do exist, here is proof that as far back as the 70’s they had lists of those who should and should not be rounded up in case of a national emergency.

[quote]“Mumia was, and is, a very sensitive, committed and thorough journalist. And his journalistic focus in large part was issues involving the inner city, involving the conflicts and tensions between those on the bottom of our society and those running it, and pretty much the daily affairs of the city.”

Linn Washington, veteran reporter and Temple University journalism professor [18][/quote]

His only achievement was not just helping to start up the philadelphia chapter of the black panthers at 15, he would later become an radio jounalist, and a free lance journalist, winning many community awards.
[quote]In Philadelphia in the mid-1970s, Mumia’s work brought him into contact with the MOVE organization. MOVE, a radical utopian largely-Black organization, was formed the year Rizzo took over City Hall. Its members lived together in communal homes as an extended family, adopting the common surname Africa, and wore their hair natural, in dreadlocks. In 1974, from their base in West Philadelphia’s Powelton Village, MOVE started speaking out at political forums and organizing community demonstrations against police brutality.

In 1974 two pregnant women from MOVE were man-handled by cops until they miscarried. MOVE’s demonstrations intensified. The police responded with a campaign of “arrest on sight.” Between 1974 and 1976, there were 400 arrests of MOVE members, resulting in bail and fines of more than half a million dollars. Life Africa, a three-week-old baby, was killed during one violent police attack. [30]

By March 1978, these confrontations came to a head when Philadelphia police clamped a siege on MOVE’s home on West Philadelphia’s Powelton Avenue. Police cut off water and electricity. They set up barricades to prevent food from entering.

Armed with his tape recorder, Mumia stepped into the middle of this mounting conflict. He later said that he gave voice to the members of the MOVE organization at a time when most Black reporters ignored them, and the mainstream press simply slandered them.[/quote]
The police after all the press they were getting pretended to back off, and then ofcourse staged a waco like attack on the residents. The organization members were put through a questionalble trial and placed in jail. He was one of the few journalists to ask the truly hard questions and carry out the function that a journalist is meant to perform.

[quote]Mumia Abu-Jamal spoke out from the crowd of journalists, sharply raising questions about the way police had destroyed evidence after the raid.

Rizzo was already on edge over the increasing coverage of police brutality spreading into the mainstream press. He could feel his long-standing support in the city’s media eroding and it bothered him. [39]

But to be publicly challenged in his own press conference by a Black journalist the same day a cop had just died in a raid–that made him livid. Rizzo’s answer to Mumia’s question was a now-famous threat: “They believe what you write, and what you say, and it’s got to stop. And one day–and I hope it’s in my career–that you’re going to have to be held responsible and accountable for what you do.”[/quote]

Three years later that would all come to a head, but not before he continued to live, work and rise in the community as someone who was nsightful, passionate and caring.

[quote]In 1980, at the age of 26, Mumia was elected president of the Philadelphia chapter of the National Association of Black Journalists. The following year, he was named one of the city’s “People to Watch” by Philadelphia magazine. The article spoke of his “eloquent, often passionate and always insightful interviews.”[/quote]

He was known as the voice of the voiceless. Then December 9, 1981 things all came to a head. 27 years ago.

[quote]The events of December 9, 1981 started as a typical police stop for “driving while Black.” Just before 4 a.m., Mumia’s younger brother Billy Cook was driving his Volkswagen Beetle in a seedy part of Philadelphia’s Center City–when he was pulled over on Locust Street by Officer Daniel Faulkner.

The official record claims that the reason for this stop was a crooked license plate and a broken bumper. But before Daniel Faulkner even climbed out of his patrol car, he had decided to arrest Billy Cook and called for a police wagon to take Cook away. Faulkner quickly had Billy Cook out of the driver’s seat, spread-eagled across his car and was beating him in the head with a weighted police flashlight. [47]

Mumia was driving his cab that night and came upon this scene. Moments later, when police backup arrived, Mumia was on the ground, shot in the chest. Faulkner was dead from two gunshot wounds and Billy Cook was standing against a wall bleeding. Anyone else involved in the incident had fled.

A cop was dead and from that moment on–true to the methods, mentality and traditions of the police–Mumia was responsible and deserved to die, no matter what the evidence (or lack of evidence) might actually say.[/quote]

Since then he has been in the system, fighting for a fair trail and litterally fighting for his life on death row.

[quote]
In the months that followed Mumia’s arrest, the machinery of Philadelphia’s notorious Homicide Squad went into motion–and systematically manufactured a case against Mumia Abu-Jamal. Evidence was suppressed. False evidence was created. Witnesses were coerced. And a notorious hanging judge was rolled out to ram this railroad through the trial process.

Mumia had been the dogged opponent of a brutal power structure for 12 intense and explosive years. He had exposed their crimes, upheld their victims, given voice to their accusers. Now he was in their hands–a political prisoner headed for death row.
[/quote]

Thus the story in part ends there, but continues now 27 years later. He has been on death row ever since then, the system then as now is the same and it has not changed. Evidence of a signed confession from another man exists from his team, suggesting that the police officer was shot in a mob style hit.

http://www.freemumia.com/beverlydeclaration.html

Abu-Jamal is still on death row waiting once again for his fate to be decided some 27 years later. Some would say that his fate was decided when he confronted the Mayor on his actions in taking down yet another group from that time period.

[quote]We are now at the crossroads of the case. This is a life and death struggle in the fight for Mumia’s freedom. His life hangs in the balance. The following are details as to what has been occurring in the Supreme Court.

Abu-Jamal v. Beard, U.S. Sup. Ct. No. 08A299: On October 3, I filed in the Supreme Court a Motion for Extension of Time to File Petition for Writ of Certiorari. Justice David H. Souter granted the motion on October 9th. The Petition is now due on December 19, 2008.[/quote]

So here it is, just one more piece of the puzzle, that’s finally helping me to put it all together. The full story is a fascinating read, and it answers the questions that I had when I first came online and started to learn about Cointelpro.

I had wondered why there were no more leaders like Martin Luther King Jr. I mean that time period seemed to have produced a lot of leaders and groups, such as the black panthers, Malcolm X, etc. The last two I grew up thinking of as outlandish radicals, but now I see that they were just a part of the same struggles that we are all a part of wither we know it or not.

So that answers that part of the puzzle for me. They are locked away in the system. If they are not dead, in prison, in process of being destroyed, or in mental wards as is the new thing to do, then they are simply unaware, or a part of the system itself.

Coitelpro as we see primarily targeted ethnic minorities, their leaders, political movements, and organizations, but even before Martin Luther King Jr’s assassination the mandate was changing for that program. The mandate had become making sure that no (black) messiahs rose up, this would mean finding creative ways to target these future messiahs, these ones that could potentially rise up and distrupt the system, cause dissidence and throw a cog in the wheel. Those at every level who refused to fall in line.

Well the machine has continued to work, and so has the corruption and the injustice. The system that existed then, as much as I wanted to believe that it had fully changed, I am in reading and researching lead to now believe that it has never really changed. Those frieghtening tentacles still exist and instead of just targeting activists and dissidents, these programs have merged and branched out. Again in accordance with new initiatives such as community policing, anti-terror laws, etc, they are alive and well, and the machine is as active as ever. With the emergence of 9/11 and overseas wars, we are simply seeing the machine mount up and show itself more clearly, apparently this is very common, during such times from what I have read.

Abu-Jamal was known as a voice for the voiceless, he helped shed light on injustice for dozens if not thousands of people throughout his time, before the system also took him out of the picture and almost silenced his voice. Today his life still hangs in the balance, and a fair trial is needed once more. Can any justice exist in this system of corruption and conformity? It’s been 27 years, and a decision is days away from being made, maybe by being a voice for his plight, and sheding some light on this case, some right can finally be achieved.

December 12, 2008 Posted by | black, Cointelpro, control, Controlled society, Corruption, Covert investigations, domestic spying, Gang Stalking, Gangstalking, harassment, Martin Luther King Jr, Minorities, oppression, Police Abuse, Police Corruption | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Unforgivable Word

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/capress/al_qaida_obama

I woke up to this headline. Al-Qaeda attacks Obama. Terrorist group uses racial slur to attack president elect.

I am going what? So I delve further into the article, because I am pretty sure, terrorist in the desert or not, whatever you want to think of them. I am hoping they know better than to use the other N word.

[quote]
Ayman al-Zawahri’s message appeared mainly aimed at persuading Muslims and Arabs that Obama does not represent a change in U.S. policies.
He said in the message that Obama is “the direct opposite of honourable black Americans” like Malcolm X, the 1960s African-American rights leader.
In al-Qaida’s first response to Obama’s victory, al-Zawahri also called him – along with former and current secretaries of state Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice – “house Negroes.” [/quote]

So he didn’t use the unforgivable word. Also this argument is one that I have heard from several other people, black or white. Some people do think that there is no change. Democrat or Republican, black or white it’s the same agenda.
I also remember recently that Jesse Jackson had to apologize for his remark where he said he felt that Obama was talking down to black people.

http://articles.latimes.com/2008/jul/10/nation/na-jackson10

[quote]“Barack, he’s talking down to black people,” Jackson said in a short clip the network aired this afternoon on “Special Report with Brit Hume.”

[/quote]
Now it’s not as flattering as being called the Magic Negro, which I still don’t see how that was meant to be flattering, but apparently it was, when used by the L.A. Times.
http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/la-oe-ehrenstein19mar19,0,5335087.story?coll=la-opinion-center

[quote]

But it’s clear that Obama also is running for an equally important unelected office, in the province of the popular imagination — the “Magic Negro.”
The Magic Negro is a figure of postmodern folk culture, coined by snarky 20th century sociologists, to explain a cultural figure who emerged in the wake of Brown vs. Board of Education. “He has no past, he simply appears one day to help the white protagonist,” reads the description on Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magical_Negro .

[/quote]
This follows on the heals of Lindsey Lohan, getting some heat for using the term Colored. I didn’t watch the video, but even if she used the term colored, it’s antiquated, but not generally in many circles considered racist.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/11/11/lindsay-lohan-calls-obama_n_143087.html

[quote]Lindsay Lohan is happy Barack Obama got elected after campaigning for him this year. But, she referred to the President-Elect with a mumbled adjective at the beginning of an interview with Access Hollywood’s Maria Menounos that some say is offensive. Does she say “good” or “colored?”

“It’s an amazing feeling. It’s our first [mumble] president.”

[/quote]
So let’s recap here people, so I don’t keep seeing those crazy headlines.

Colored is an antiquated word, but at the time of it’s popularity was I don’t think primarily a negative word. (Though it was used as a divisive word)

Black the preferred term outside of America, and the Afro American term. In Canada, the UK, and many other parts of the world Black is the preferred term.

Negro, Not a popular term in this time period, but still not considered a racist word. In fact the term is still used by the United Negro College Fund. Because a mind is a terrible thing to waste.

The last and final word which I will not debate here, but I still think falls into the unforgivable word category. The N_gger word. Used by some urban kids and some adults, the word has throughout history had a negative connotation. It still does in many circles. Urban culture has tried to reclaim and recapture the term and often use it amongst themselves, much to the shagrin of people like Oprah and many others in the black community and outside, who find the term highly offensive.

The term is a dubious one, because depending on who uses it, it’s often over looked in some cases, Eg. If used by a black person, vs if used by another race. Some people think that the term should be not used by anyone. (I am in agreement with this.)

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/6406625.stm

[quote]The city council of New York has voted to ban the use of the word “nigger”.

The resolution to ban the so-called “N-word” is largely symbolic as it carries no weight in law and those who use the word would face no punishment.

But it reflects a growing unease that the racial slur is now part of everyday conversation and that the taboo against its usage has been swept away.

The word is in common usage among sections of the younger generation in the United States.

‘Throwback to slavery’

For many years the “N-word” has been used by young African Americans who have appropriated it as a, perhaps ironic, term of endearment.

Now, other ethnic groups have started to use it in a similar context, and those who insist it should be banned are growing increasingly outraged.

Many African American community leaders, with the backing of fellow lawmakers, say it is offensive in every context and that is a word which should never be said.
[/quote]

So that’s a little bit of a history lesson on words that are popping up left right and center and dubious headlines that I keep coming across. Let’s not go crazy people. Obama hopefully will not be the last black (bi-racial) president ever. I think it’s great the media is taking care to make sure that he feels welcome and people are being sensitive on his behalf, wither it’s making sure that the colored term is not used again, or other precautions, but let’s keep things in context here.
Here are some pics of Obama with his grand parents.

http://www.moonbattery.com/ObamaGrandparents.jpg

With his dad’s family

http://atlasshrugs2000.typepad.com/atlas_shrugs/images/2008/03/31/obama_family.jpg

with his mom

http://maremare1225.files.wordpress.com/2008/03/sweet.jpg
His mom’s family

http://theladnerreportblog.blogspot.com/2008/05/hard-working-white-people-should_13.html
With is family
http://imgs.sfgate.com/c/pictures/2008/03/15/mn_obama_family.jpg
With his grand daddy
http://a.abcnews.com/images/Nightline/ht_beach_080131_ssv.jpg

So unless someone uses the unforgivable word, can we stop with the crazy headlines, please.

November 20, 2008 Posted by | Awareness, black, discrimination, male, Minorities, Politics, society, White | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment