Gang Stalking World

United we stand. Divided they fall.

Male Rape. Part 6

Psychological Issues

It’s been said before, but it needs to be said again. The effects of male rape can cause Rape Related Trauma in men and women. It’s a form of post traumatic stress disorder related to rape which can last a lifetime if not dealt with. It can cause a range of emotions and psychological issue in men.

Because of the way male rape has been dealt with or rather not dealt with in prisons, many men are leaving jail, and spending the rest of their stays in jail with these issues unresolved.

When they go out or are released back into society these issue continue to play themselves out. Which can have other unforeseen consequences for society, such as financial or the risk of violence being repeated in society.

More men are raped in jail than women are raped in the whole of the United States.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prison_rape

[quote]In 2001 Human Rights Watch estimated that at least 140,000 inmates in the US had been raped while incarcerated,[1] and there is a significant variation in the rates of prison rape by race. Stop Prisoner Rape, Inc. statistics indicate that there are more men raped in U.S. prisons than non-incarcerated women similarly assaulted. They estimate that young men are five times more likely to be attacked; and that the prison rape victims are ten times more likely to contract a deadly disease.[/quote]
HIV/AIDS

Next to natural causes, this is the second leading cause of death in male prisons across America. Due to the unsafe nature of male on male sex in these prisons, and the promiscuous nature of male on male sex, a mans chances of being exposed to HIV are very high. Nothing is being done to stop this, such as handing out condoms, or even trying to stop the rapes from happening.

There has been legislation passed to try to combat rapes in America, but without the staff to further stop this from happening, legislation alone won’t work.

The way some men lessen their chances of HIV and being passed around to dozens or hundreds of men in their prison stays is to enter into a protective pairing, where they take on one person to have sex with, who protects them from others, so they decrease their chances of getting HIV.

In a protective pairing their may be more opportunities to practice some kind of safety, verses being forced into unprotected sex with multiple assailants.
Suicide

This is the third leading cause of death in prisons right after HIV. It’s little surprise how many men try to take this as an option vs being raped repeatedly and passed around in jail.

One of the worst story of this kind of the story of 17 year old Rodney Hulin.

[quote]My name is Rodney Hulin and I work at a retirement home here in Beaumont, Texas. I am here today because of my son. He would be here himself if he could . . . . But he can’t because he died in [an adult prison]. . . . [At age seventeen], my son was raped and sodomized by an inmate. The doctor found two tears in his rectum and ordered an HIV test, since up to a third of the 2,200 inmates there were HIV positive. Fearing for his safety, he requested to be placed in protective custody, but his request was denied because, as the warden put it, “Rodney’s abuses didn’t meet the ’emergency grievance criteria.'” For the next several months, my son was repeatedly beaten by the older inmates, forced to perform oral sex, robbed, and beaten again. Each time, his requests for protection were denied by the warden. The abuses, meanwhile, continued. On the night of January 26, 1996–seventy-five days after my son entered Clemens–Rodney attempted suicide by hanging himself in his cell. He could no longer stand to live in continual terror. It was too much for him to handle. He laid in a coma for the next four months until he died.(183)

In early 1995, Rodney Hulin, Jr., received an eight year sentence for arson. He was sixteen years old but was sentenced to serve his time in adult prison.

On November 13, 1995, Hulin was transferred to the Clemens Unit in Brazoria County, Texas. Older inmates there immediately started to threaten and harass him; within a week he was raped. With a medical examination confirming the rape, Hulin requested protective custody. “He went through all the proper channels, trying to get protection,” recalled his father, who found out about the rape in a letter from his son. “Rodney was very small–probably the smallest person on the unit. He was 5’2” and weighed about 125. A first offender. I can’t fathom why they wouldn’t help him.”(184)[/quote]

Being a target of rape or sexual assault in the first week is not uncommon, in fact many man are targeted within the first 48 hrs. This can happen in the jails as well as the prisons.

Young men like Rodney are prime targets for this kind of jail house assault. Many do prison stints where they are routinely exposed to this type of abuse, unless they can find a way to stop it, which usually involves violence such as stabbing or killing another inmate, which then has the potential to leave them in prison for life. Or breaking the laws in prison, and staying on restrictions which do not allow any time out for good behaviour, but this is the way some men are able to protect themselves, it’s not always guaranteed.
Being Turned out and staying turned out

Being made to take on a feminine role, engage in male on male sex, or “being turned out” can cause confusion, shame, and powerlessness in men. It can cause enough confusion that some will stay permanently turned out, meaning they will continue to have male on male sex.

As we saw in the film turned out,
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M4_uvvcaDqw

Issy went on to become a full out homosexual. Mark at the end of the film ended up in a monogamous relationship with another man. Mark had always been the dominant male in the male on male interactions, yet by the end of the documentary he was saying that he could see himself in a male on male relationship.

Will he be part of the down-low culture when he get’s out of jail? It’s hard to say. I was not able to research if these prison interactions were adding to the down-low culture in men.

CSA.

Childhood Sexual Abuse.

I did find out that unexplored issues of Childhood Sexual Abuse (CSA) might in part be adding to this phenomenon more than realised, but that needs further research.

In the film we also saw Matt a young white male who after being raped, and turned out, LaMoore and Mark become very promiscuous with many of the men on the floor, yet when he was released from jail he went on to date a young women who he described as a fox. Was Matt ever tested for STD’s after what happened to him? It’s unknown, but HIV testing should be offered to these men, as should ways of protecting themselves.

As we saw in the Rodney Hulin story where he staying a third of the men had HIV.

Summary.

Books Male on Male Rape

Male on Male rape is just one small aspect of male rape. It has not looked at the phenomenon in other part of society such as in the community, which is as high as 10% of the rapes reported, but could be potentially higher.

In the military it could in some areas be as high as 50%

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2009716522_militaryrape23m.html
[quote]
… make up 49% of military sexual-trauma victims.

Men
[/quote]

This report did not look at female on male rape either. The issue of male rape is so broad and varied and so under reported and studied that it really is an issue that needs to be explored and better understood.

There is an unspoken acceptance of this in society which contributes to this going unchecked and unreported. If this is going to change for future generations of men, then it has to start with society and their attitudes around this issue. More awareness and exposure is needed to help bring this very important topic into the spotlight.

http://www.ncvc.org/ncvc/main.aspx?dbName=DocumentViewer&DocumentID=32361

[quote]About 3% of American men – a total of 2.78 million men – have experienced a rape at some point in their lifetime (Tjaden & Thoennes, 2006).
In 2003, one in every ten rape victims was male. While there are no reliable annual surveys of sexual assaults on children, the Justice Department has estimated that one of six victims are under age 12 (National Crime Victimization Study, 2003).
71% of male victims were first raped before their 18th birthday; 16.6% were 18-24 years old, and 12.3% were 25 or older (Tjaden & Thoennes, 2006).
Males are the least likely to report a sexual assault, though it is estimated that they make up 10% of all victims (RAINN, 2006).
22% of male inmates have been raped at least once during their incarceration; roughly 420,000 prisoners each year (Human Rights Watch, 2001).[/quote]

Also since male rape, sexual assult is so under reported at every level, the figures are likely to be higher in some areas then others than known.

August 24, 2009 Posted by | Awareness, Black Male, society, White Male | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Male Rape. Part 4.

Sexual Slavery.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M4_uvvcaDqw

It’s hard to imagine that this is happening in the U.S. but it is. In these prisons men are being bought and sold for sex. They are being used for oral, anal and other sexual practices, and some are being sold as property. This is happening to young men, 16, 17, etc year olds who get placed with older men, this is happening to white males, gay males, effeminate males, and black and Hispanic men as well.
http://www.hrw.org/legacy/reports/2001/prison/case_histories2.html#pe

[quote]S.H.

I was “rented out” for sexual favors, and a lot of the guys who rented me are not rapists, or assaulted as children, or any other stereotypical model. They just wanted some sexual satisfaction, even though they knew I was not deriving pleasure from it, and was there only because I was forced to . . . . I was with the Valluco (Valley) crowd, so I was only passed around to them for free. D. Town Hispanics had to pay. They were charged $3 for a blow-job, $5 for anal sex . . . . I am not effeminate, nor am I even homosexual.(277)

With two prior nonviolent felonies, S.H. received a seventy-five year sentence for burglary in 1994. He was twenty-four years old.[/quote]

This happens a lot and men get rented out and bought and sold. According to the letters sent to no escape the guards are well aware of these practices and they just don’t care.

S.H. story is heartbreaking and it’s one of the worst that I have heard. Take a moment to read his full story, it will give you an idea of what can happen to men in prison.

http://www.genderberg.com/phpNuke/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=95

[quote]

According to court papers and his own detailed account, the Gangster Disciples and then other gangs treated Mr. Johnson as a sex slave. They bought and sold him, and they rented him out. Some sex acts cost $5, others $10.

Last month, a federal appeals court allowed a civil rights lawsuit that Mr. Johnson has filed against prison officials to go to trial. The ruling, the first to acknowledge the equal protection rights of homosexuals abused in prison, said the evidence in the case was “horrific.”

“I was forced into oral sex and anal sex on a daily basis,” said Mr. Johnson, who has been living in a boarding house here since his release in December. “Not for a month or two. For, like, 18 months.”

The phenomenon of sexual slavery in prison has only recently emerged from the shadows. Prison rape, in general, has received sporadic notice over the years and sustained attention more recently, with the passage last year of a federal law that aims to eliminate it. But there has never been a comprehensive study of incarcerated gay men subjected to sexual abuse.
[/quote]

Psychological Submission.

page 84

[quote]Viewed from outside, the sexual relationship between J.D. and his cell-mate would likely have appeared consensual. Indeed, in instances where the victim makes little apparent effort to escape the abuse, both prisoners and prison authorities often fall into the trap of viewing non-consensual sexual activity as consensual, ignoring the larger context in which the activity takes place. 8 Consent however assumes the existence of choice. As will be described in more detail below, where prisoners feel unprotected and know in advance that their escape routes are closed, a narrow focus on consent is misguided. In other words, the relevant inquiry in evaluating sexual activity in prison is not simply “did the inmate consent to sex?” but also “did the inmate have the power to refuse unwanted sex?”[/quote]

The other thing is to avoid the shame of having to say that they were raped and forced, or having to be raped by dozens of men, some men will eventually give in and chose to have one man. The idea is that it is better to have to service one man, than to have to be the toy of dozens or hundreds of men over a prison stay, just increasing the chances of physically being torn and bruised, repeatedly beaten, and raped. In situations like this, men can be passed around and treated as women, forced to wear lipstick, dress in tight clothing, taking on the role of females, but this is done in order to survive. To however say that because they submitted under these conditions that it was consensual is a misconception.
Books male on male rape

[quote]
[B]ased on my experience the most common kind of rape in prisons today is the confidence rape which involve the rapist getting the confidence of the victim and then at some point turning on him and raping him. In my opinion the next in frequency would be the date rape where one inmate convinces another to double cell with him and then t some point rapes him. The next would be extortion rape followed by drugging rape and finally strong arm rape. The reason strong arm rape is the least frequent is because it is so much easier to rape an inmate using the other techniques. None of the types of prison rape described are rare. If anything they are rarely reported. Rape really is a big problem in prison today. To give you an idea of how frequent rape is in prison, if victims would report every time they were raped in prison I would say that in the prison that I am in (which is a medium security prison) there would be a reported incident every day.
__________________
V.H., Pennsylvania, 3/15/97
[/quote]
[quote]You take a guy who’s been raped in prison and he is going to be filled with a tremendous amount of rage….Now eventually he is going to get out. Most people do. And all the studies show that today’s victim is tomorrow’s predator. So by refusing to deal with this in an intelligent way, you are genuinely sentencing society to an epidemic of future rapes. 41[/quote]

The violations are accepted by prison and jail officials alike, and the inmates of the jail. It’s that this is just how it is attitude, and many end up having to deal with it.

From the book No escape, rape in US jails you get a really comprehensive view of what is happening to these men. There is truly no escape, no where to run, no one to turn to, and no help.

In many cases the assaults go unreported for fear of reprisals, being labeled a snitch, or a complete indifference on the part of prison officials. In other cases when the rapes do get reported, they are treated as nothing important, if a case makes it to court, the court often side with the prosecutors, and dismiss the cases, the victims are often just like others in the past re-victimized by the system. They are left without recourse and yes they often have to go back into the violent environments that were responsible for their rapes in the first place.

Many men are raped repeatedly and by numerous sources. In many cases it’s not for a lack of trying to fight back, or to try to resist the attempts of aggression, it’s just an environment that is hard to understand unless you have read of their experiences.
Recommendations

When they get out and while they are in, men need mental health help to deal with the things that happen to them in prison, the violence, rapes, traumas. They need to be tested, but they need privacy, in jail nothing is secret or sacred, so many men do not get tested, do not report rapes, do not use protection, cause the option is not there.

Stop the over crowding in jail. Many of these men do not belong in jail, they could be placed elsewhere for none violent offences.

Immediate orientation for men and women entering prisons on how to avoid sexual assault. Virgina Department of Corrections has such a program. It’s not hard to implement and it could save lives.

Testing of inmates before they come to jail, and after they leave. (Not mandatory, but recommended.)

When they get out many will again repeat acts of violence, because they were not helped, and the vicious cycle will continue.
Known rapists should not be housed with other men who are vulnerable. They just keep raping and raping them.

However to answer your question, this is what I surprisingly came across, in my opinion based on the research that I read, that others have already done into this, and the book no escape, male rape in America, then these are things that need to be done. The sooner the better.

Men may even have to ban together to form class action law suits.

August 24, 2009 Posted by | Awareness, Black Male, control, discrimination, Entrapment, Intimidation, silence, slaves, Social Control, White Male | , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Male Rape. Part 2

I don’t know what I thought of the issue before I started to research it. I knew it happened in society and in jails. I did to an extent realise that guys were somehow expected to manage it, like it did not happen and why was this expected? Why was there almost a code of silence about this?

What I found is that not only is there a code of silence about this, but the victimized are being ignored, rebuffed, blamed, and much like female rape victims of yesteryear, they are being told in many cases it was their fault. They asked for it, they were secretly gay, real men fight back, their complaints are being covered up by officials. The officials went to make the problems seem like they are not that bad, or that the problem does not really exist the way we think, but my initial research tells me the problem is systemic, and far worst than we realise. Much more vast, and it has far reaching consequences that some are just starting to wake up to.

There are a lot of problems that are happening in the prison system, the rapes were just one aspect with many other branches.

History.

War On Drugs
The story probably began with the war on drugs, mandatory minimum sentences, and people being put away for minor offences, topped with the three strike rule in some states.

This has lead to over crowding of American Prisons. Horrific conditions which are hard to imagine, the country now has 1 in 31 of it’s citizens in jail, probation or parole. 2.1 million Americans are behind bars. America has the reputation for being the country with more citizens behind bars than any other nation. Of those behind bars, the Black or African/American population makes up over 40% or more of that number, even though this group only comprises 14% of the population.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2003/aug/19/usa.garyyounge

I read an article that said black men stand a 1 in 3 chance of going to jail in their life times if this trend continues.
[quote]Black men born in the United States in 2001 will have a one in three chance of going to prison during their lifetime if current trends continue, according to a report by the US justice department.

More than 5.6 million Americans are either in prison or have served time there – and that number will continue to rise, the report shows. [/quote]
Statistics
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incarceration_in_the_United_States
[quote]American prisons and jails held 2,299,116 inmates as of June 30, 2007.[12] One in every 31 American adults, or 7.3 million Americans, are in prison, on parole or probation. Approximately one in every 18 men in the United States is behind bars or being monitored. A significantly greater percentage of the American population is in some form of correctional control even though crime rates have declined by about 25 percent from 1988-2008.[13] 70% of prisoners in the United States are non-whites.[14] In recent decades the U.S. has experienced a surge in its prison population, quadrupling since 1980, partially as a result of mandated sentences that came about during the “war on drugs.” Violent crime and property crime have declined since the early 1990s.[15][/quote]

 
http://lushenabks.com/9780979295300.html

Why are so many black men in Prison?

This book details the author’s personal story of a negligent upbringing in an impoverished community, his subsequent engagement in criminal activity (drug dealing), his incarceration, and his release from prison and experiencing of the crippling social disenfranchisement that comes with being an ex-felon. The author then relates his personal experiences and realizations to the seminal problems within the African-American community, federal government, and criminal justice system that cause his own experiences to be the same experiences of millions of other young Black men.

 
The WALL
Prisoners of the War on Drugs

http://www.november.org/thewall/wall/wall.html

Before I continue I just want to point out that there is ample evidence that much of the drug problem that affected some minority communities were deliberate in nature and scope and were orchestrated by government authorities. Eg. The CIA bringing drugs into these communities, getting people hooked, selling etc. Then get the men and women to become indentured slaves, (snitches for the state) to avoid going to jail. For the ones who chose jail they were given outrageous prison sentences for drug possession or sales.
Gary Webb
 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gary_Webb

http://www.amazon.ca/gp/search?index=books&linkCode=qs&keywords=1888363932

Gary Webb who later died and had his career destroyed documented and who the dark alliance series about the CIA bring drugs into these communities.

Anita Bell a lawyer who tried to prosecute for this was disbarred, fled to Canada, then Israel. She also had her life destroyed for trying to take on the state and expose what was happening.

August 24, 2009 Posted by | Conformity, conspiracies, control, Controlled society, Corruption | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment