Gang Stalking World

United we stand. Divided they fall.

Refuse to live in fear

Fear it’s the power that controls and consumes the lives of many people right now. As long as they are consumed by the fear they will be controlled by it. As long as they let others tell them what to be afraid of they will control the masses.

Wars on Drugs, War on Terror, Street Gangs, Global Warming, Swine Flu, etc. It can be anything, the only person or persons that can control this fear or stop it from happening is us. We the people. We have the power and they know it, thus they keep us in a constant state of fear. They put weak and pathetic leaders forwards, ones in their control, who we are then told to emulate.

You see this questionable leadership in all areas of society, but most people never question it, it’s always been like this and they don’t think that things can change, or that they will change. Also they are so comfortable, they are too lazy to put in the effort that it would take to make a change. Even if it’s slavery it’s still a routine that they know and they are willing to work with it.

Targeted Individuals know a lot about fear. We deal with fear when we are mobbed, targeted, electronically harassed, and the various other things that targets go through. Being afraid is a normal human emotion and there is nothing wrong with it, but when it overpowers and controls your life, then it’s a bad thing. That’s when it becomes a problem.

Many targets deal with fears that most people think make them look crazy. Eg. They get sensitized over time to a color, word, action, ect and finally all the negative associations, or the big event that it took to make them sensitized is not needed, any little trigger event will do, and these informants on a daily basis will use little trigger events to keep the target scared and in their control.

They will also try to anchor on other things to keep targets scared of more things, till their life becomes one big fear factor. That is the goal, then all they have to do is snap a finger, jingle a key, cough, sneeze, use the color red, patterns, snap laptops, etc, and the target reacts. Those are some of the sensitivities I have heard about since coming online. These are designed to keep the Targeted Individual in a state of anxiety or fear. Before these little events could work, they used big events to try to make the target afraid. Eg. When I first started being electronically harassed and burnt in my home, or as the informants like to call it, (electronically monitored) they use to always try to attach a noise of a drill to the torture. So there I would be getting burnt, and then at the time I knew nothing about shielding and had no defence so it was pretty raw, and painful. They consistently tried to make sure that drilling was attached to the torture, this was over several months. So when I went back out into the world, they were sure, and banking on the fact that I would be sensitized to the sound of drills and then they could just tell the informants, this person has a phobia, is very sensitize to drills, acts out is not normal, ah but they failed. For the next two years and even to today, they still attempt it once in awhile to see if I was sensitized. It just shows me that with proper knowledge, we can win out over these people in small little ways, day by day.

See I was lucky, I had one sensitivity, I had it for years. Before my torture with electronic harassment started I learnt about anchors, so I realized that they would be trying to attach another sensitivity to the one I already had. I had a working knowledge of Pavlov and the dog experiment so I was familiar with what they were trying to do.

Eg. Pavlov would ring a bell during his dog’s feeding time. The dog would start to salivate over the food. After a while he could just ring the bell and the dog would start to salivate, cause he had associated the sound with food, in our case we associate the sensitivity to negative things they have done to us over time, without in many cases even realising that they are sensitizing us till it’s too late.

The sensitivity that I had when my electronic harassment began, I spent that time at home being tortured and electronically harassed, but also getting over my sensitivity. It was not perfect, but over the next few months, it got better, and is at a normal level to what it was before the sensitivity started.

So what does this have to do with fear that the average person’s experiences? Well let’s take 9/11 a big, huge event that got everyone scared, panicked. Most people because they shared the fear understand it and agree that this was a fear worthy event, and understand and accept that people are scared and have a phobia about this event happening again.

So now several years later, you don’t need another 9/11 to keep the people scared, the occasional terrorist threat, weird plane flying over New York, and keep the citizens on high alert and they are in the grips of fear, and it works. Also if we get them scared of 9/11 then we can add in other fears, attach additional fears.

See these people try to stop us from living our lives by trying to scare us, systemically trying to destroy us, and they want to try to control us. Well 9/11 does the same for the average citizen.

When people are scared they can do silly things, behave in what to the average person seems like irrational behavior, but to them seems perfectly normal. To an outsider that did not know about 9/11, voodoo rituals of taking off belts, shoes, and allowing oneself to be scanned and shown virtually naked to some stranger, would seem bizarre if not flat out crazy, an outsider would laugh and be like what’s wrong with these people, allowing themselves to be treated like that and give up their rights? But because the fear has happened over the last several years it seems normal to the people that share this common fear. Just like our phobias are normal to us, based on our experiences.

Getting past fear, not feeding the fear factor. For my sensitivity it was a process. Each time I was home, I worked on it, I did not have the daily exposure, I knew it was irrational, I knew how it had come about, and I had a pretty good idea how to go about disassociating it with negative things, but it took time, and I had to work on it.

Fear is something that we have in many ways, it’s normal and healthy, it can even keep us safe, but there is a stage where fear becomes irrational and even hurtful. Most times fear is individually based and if your phobia is going to an extreme level, an outsider can often point this out. However fear of 9/11 was group based, and the fear is shared by such a large group that their irrational actions, and activities are not being registered. The vast majority see these crazy measures, as something sane. They see giving up their rights, privacy, dignity as something needful to keep them safe. The fear is so deep routed that they are not only willing to give up their rights as a society and individuals, but then they are like a drug addict willing to drag down those around them who don’t see things this way, those who refuse to give into this irrationality.

They want others to be scared the way they are, and those of us who just don’t function this way, they are happy to take aware our rights, our freedoms. They are happy to go to other countries and attack others to try to bring about safety and security, which only succeeds in making more enemies, but instead of seeing this for what it is, they continue on in the same vain as before. Doing more harm to their chances of having a normal safe future.

Fear can be strong, powerful and irrational. At some stage however if you want to get better as an individual, or as a society, you have to stop giving into this fear, you have to find some way to let it go. Unfortunately being scared, living in fear works for many right now, too many, and like Dr Phil says, if it’s working for you, you are not going to change. Something about this cycle of fear and stupidity is working for a large majority of people, and the rest of us are caught up in their self destructive spiral of destruction.

We can’t force them to stop being scared, I don’t believe that we have the right. But we can point out why the fear is irrational, encourage them to help them get past the fear. We can raise our own vibrational levels, refuse to live in fear in our own lives, and try to help those around us who are gripped by fear to get past it. Many never get past it, but they might be able to get to a stage where they are functioning in a rational and sane manner again. McCarthyism continued until just a few stood up and said, enough is enough, “have you no shame,” and then it fell apart from there.

Change can happen, you can stop living in fear. It’s a painful, daily emotional experience, I am not trying to pretend that it will be easy. Right now this fear is enslaving and to many the fear appears to be protecting, but it’s not, however people will only see this in their own time, when they get ready to deal with the fear. For many it will be never. Yesterday it was the Russian’s, they were the one’s to fear, they were going to drop that nuclear bomb anytime. That fear seemed logical to some, and it allowed them to do crazy things. Today it’s terrorist. Tomorrow it will likely be someone else, or something else. Whatever will get a response from the people. Just like whatever will get a response from the Targeted Individual.

Each person has to take some individual responsibility for what is happening. It’s a normal thing in today’s society to be scared, but each person has to try to move past that fear.

First realise that there is a problem. The society is being destroyed by this fear. The rights and freedoms that you claim others envy so much, where are they? Are they running around naked at airports, well not running around naked, but being scanned naked, with privates available for view? (Yes the naughty bits will be available for view, or there is no point in having the scanners.) Are they getting mind read at the airports? When do you say enough is enough?

Even if the worst thing does happen, you would pick up your lives, your psyche and continue on, that is how normal societies function, and I know you probably don’t want to hear this from the Targeted Individual, but you are no longer behaving in a rational manner.

If you are able to realise that there is a problem with what is happening, then you need to ask yourself what can you do at an individual level to fix this problem? Then take it from there.

Fear controls us as long as we let it. I have watched psycho nut jobs, some of these informants try to destroy my life for years. Jobless at times, threats of losing my roof over my head, almost daily attempts to run/drive into me in lethal ways. Plus the just being annoyed by the informants as they try to provoke. I have been there done that, it’s not a place I like, and it’s one that I want to stay away from. Like others I have to work at it.

If you can raise yourself up from the fear, then you can help others. Some of us got past the Flu Fear recently, and Global Warming fears, but they seem to always be able to pull the people back in with the terror scare. Until you the people find a way to stop being scarred, then they have us, and the terrorists real or imagined, planned or unplanned will have it and you will have lost.

Overcoming fear is not easy, it’s a daily process, but we have to try because freedom and democratic security are worth fighting for.

January 10, 2010 Posted by | 9/11, Brain reading device, changing vibrations, Citizen Informants, Community harassment, community mobbing, control, Controlled society, Covert investigations, crazy, Gang Stalking, Gangstalking, harassment, Informants, Insane, Intimidation, Mind Reading, Monitoring, Surveillence, Targeted Individual, Torture, vibrations | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Beyond these walls

I specifically started to look at male rape in society, but ended up focusing on the prison system, because it was so convoluted. What I found out about male rape in America really blew my mind. How prevalent it was. Even within the army.

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2009716522_militaryrape23m.html

[quote]“This is not a ‘woman’ problem,” said Mountjoy-Pepka. A little more than half of military sexual-trauma victims are men, mostly because they make up a majority of veterans, according to the VA.[/quote]

More men get raped inside of American Prisons, then women get raped on the outside. Not to say that women do not get raped in prison, because they do, but this should give you an idea of how far spread male rape is in America.

I also discovered that prisoners are 4-7 times more likely to be HIV positive then the rest of the general population.

There was one prison where one third of the population was HIV positive. 737 men or something like that.

The scary part about the rapes is they had been going on for years and were just an accepted part of society. Eg. The stupid late night talk shows, it’s seen as just a part of prison life, but it’s really no laughing matter.

People don’t just get raped in prison. They also get raped in the jails. Even if they are just staying their for one night it can happen.

Raped in jail after one night

[quote]

Instead, political protesters, people accused of driving under the influence of alcohol and substance abusers have shared harrowing incidents of rape while in custody, sometimes while spending only one night behind bars. “This is something that could happen to a kid who has no priors and who happens to make a mistake,” Smith added.

[/quote]

one article suggested that maybe up to half the men in jail are having male on male sex, in many cases unwillingly, or for protecting, taking on protective pairings.

Getting turned out is quite common as is sexual slavery. Getting turned out means getting raped, be it physically or psychologically into performing sexual acts on other men. Sexual salvery is just that, being owned and passed and sold for sex to other men.

Men who are slight build, effeminate looking, gay, white, or just young, jail and prison are not the place to be. Even if you are big and strong it can happen. Even if you are a leader of a group or movement makes little difference. (Segregation options for the protection of these men should be looked into.)

http://www.cybercemetery.unt.edu/archive/nprec/20090820154816/http://nprec.us/publication/

I was surprised at how much it had been covered up over the years, and the main reason it had continued was due to the indifference of the wardens, and those in charge of the prisons.

A lot of the men who are getting raped commit suicide, many go on to become HIV positive, other become violent, many have psychological issues.

The rapists get off Scott free, and they go back out into our communities eventually, some will likely rape again. The men who get attacked also go back out into the community. Many with issues, some unable to work, some who will also rape as a way to get their power back.

The HIV and other diseases are being spread back into the outside world do to prison releases and lack of testing, and treatment. Eg. Black women in the U.S. are one of the fastest growing groups for HIV, and the contributing factor is likely the men they come in contact with, who have been in the prisons.

http://gangstalking.wordpress.com/2009/08/24/male-rape-part-6/

I read story after story after story. It was horrible. No one should have to go through this. After natural causes, then AIDS, suicide is the third leading cause of death, and a lot of the times it’s by men who have been raped. I read so many stories of men who had tried to kill themselves after a rape and then survived and did not know what to do after, because they were put back out to be gang raped, repeatedly again. It was horrible.
Some of these man ended up choosing a protecting pairing, which means that they choose to have a man protect them, and in exchange provide sexual services. Previous to this I might have judged these men harshly, but after reading the stories I can’t judge and I feel sorry that anyone should have to go through that.

The ones who do come forward to press charges are mocked and ridiculed and told that it’s their fault, or that they should take care of their own business, or that they were willing, it’s disgusting how the Powers that be, tried to cover this up, over and over and over again.

Others are forced to commit acts of violence which in some cases lead to them spending life in prison, just to try to avoid getting raped.

After Human Rights Watch stepped in and interviewed the men, and while working with other groups, they were able to get the Rape Elimination Act passed in 2003, decades after such a law should have been in place. Then in June of 2009, the recommendations from that report came out, and it’s here if you want to read it.

http://www.cybercemetery.unt.edu/archive/nprec/20090820154816/http://nprec.us/publication/

What also surprised me in looking into the issue is that it’s systemic, and has been for years. It’s an open secret, well not so secret, but it was covered up, just like many other things in society. They tried to make it look like it was not that bad, or that the men were willingly having sex, and just crying rape. That’s not the case.

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/pdf/piusp01.pdf

If the prison rates continue, it’s estimated that About 1 in 3 black males, 1 in 6. Hispanic males, and 1 in 17 white males are expected to go to these prisons jails at some point in their lifetimes. Think about that.
1 in 31 U.S. adults had served time in prison.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/29469360/

[quote]The Pew Center on the States report, released Monday, says the number of people on probation or parole nearly doubled to more than 5 million between 1982 and 2007. Including jail and prison inmates, the total population of the U.S. corrections system now exceeds 7.3 million — one of every 31 U.S. adults, it said.[/quote]

When I looked into this it was pretty gritty, but it was important because not only is injustice anywhere injustice everywhere, but these people are brothers, husbands, sons, uncles, nephews, cousins, and many are non violent offenders. People were going to jail for political protests, and getting raped, and minor things like DUI. Drinking and getting drunk then driving is wrong, but getting raped for it is also really wrong. I was surprised by what I learnt when I really look into this. It’s such a wide topic, and will the recommendations of Human Rights Watch ever been truly implemented? I want to watch and see what happens over the next year, since the recommendations only came out in June of this year.

Raped in jail after just one night

[quote]Instead, political protesters, people accused of driving under the influence of alcohol and substance abusers have shared harrowing incidents of rape while in custody, sometimes while spending only one night behind bars. “This is something that could happen to a kid who has no priors and who happens to make a mistake,” Smith added.[/quote]

What is clear to me is that the average person sitting back with their heads in the sand saying this will never affect them should not do so. If you are American then this could affect you or someone you know. 1 in 31 US adults had some experience of prison, and that could increase to 1 in 15 if trends continue.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2003/aug/19/usa.garyyounge

[quote]By the end of 2001 one in every 37 Americans had some experience of prison, compared with one in 53 in 1974. Continuing at that rate, the proportion will increase to one in every 15 of those born in 2001.[/quote]

If you don’t go to prison or jail, you could actually know someone who does, and think about the risks that they could be exposed to, even if it’s just one night in jail. Think of when these men get out of jail, both the perpetrators and the victims of this crime, and if untreated, or unpunished, think of the ramifications that society will face.

I went in somewhat naive about the issue, but what I do know now is that this is not just an issue for those on the inside of these jails and prisons, it’s an issue for the Americans outside of these walls. Every year 650,000 will get released from jails and prisons. http://www.reentry.gov/

[quote]Nearly 650,000 people are released from state and federal prison yearly and arrive on the doorsteps of communities nationwide. A far greater number reenter communities from local jails, and for many offenders and /defendants, this may occur multiple times in a year. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) over 50 percent of those released from incarceration will be in some form of legal trouble within 3 years.[/quote]

Some will re offend again, yes some will rape and commit other crimes. Some will have diseases, some psychological issues that need to be dealt with. Harsh prison stays do not guarantee that people will not go back to jail or prison, or that they will learn some kind of lesson, all it does is create individuals that upon release from these places, who will educate society about the lessons that they have learnt. If those lessons are that it’s ok to rape young effeminate looking men, then your daughters, sons, might be at risk. Their younger family members might be at risk. For the ones that do get raped, they may commit suicide, be ill within the community, they may feel a need to rape to regain their power that was taken, they may do other psychologically disruptive acts within the community.

It’s important that people realise that what is happening in these prisons is not staying there, it goes beyond those walls, and it affects and is causing sometimes grave dissonant ripples within society, upon
release of these men back into society.

The best way to stop the negative effects is to stop some of what is happening.

My number one recommendation is ending the war on drugs.
The war on drugs is the main contributor to the over crowding in those jails, if the war ends, much of the over crowding will end.

If overcrowding ends, then prison staff have a better chance of being responsive to what they are suppose to be responsive to. Also more focus could then be placed on hiring guards who actually want to stop prison rape, instead of just covering it up.

If you stop the rapes in prison, it will cut down on some of the HIV, other diseases, suicides, etc.

When the men are released, they will have less psychological issues to pass on to the rest of society, less diseases, and if they get proper help to reenter society, less chances of them re-offending and going back to jail.

This war on drugs has had a terrible toll on American society. I really never knew much about the war on drugs. I knew it was there, I believed people who did drugs got what they deserved, (I was deeply wrong, since reading their stories, I see now, and apologize.) they don’t deserve these prison stays. The conditions within prisons were always bad, the war on drugs has made it worst.

Rapes in prison do not have to be, they can stop, but you have to have people who give a damn first, that is the greatest contributing factor towards wither this get’s stopped or not.

Also the war on drugs is a failure.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/diane-francis/americas-war-on-drugs-a-f_b_188269.html

[quote]The issue involves America’s foolish and expensive War on Drugs which has not worked and threatens to ruin Mexico, Bolivia, Ecuador as it has ruined Colombia.

The issue was articulated this week at the World Economic Forum confab in Rio de Janeiro when Columbia’s former president made an impassioned appeal for leaders in Latin America to condemn the U.S. War on Drugs because it threatens the stability of many countries in the hemisphere.

Canada is also increasingly harmed by America’s vast appetite for drugs, with cartels infesting the country which is a transshipment nation for narcotics. There are increasing numbers of gangland slayings in Vancouver, for instance, and the proliferation of “grow ops” across the country which are producing high-grade marijuana for export. While worrisome in Canada, the American prohibition against drugs, and failure to address the underlying causes, are devastating to the Caribbean and Latin America.[/quote]

I also read that more people are using drugs than were using drugs before such as marijuana and cocaine in America. So if the war on drugs has failed, then why not end it? Oh I am not naive enough to believe that legalized drugs would be a good idea for any society. I am anti drugs and so I will stay, but after doing the research, I do now think it’s time to decriminalize these drugs. I have felt this way for some time since doing the research and believe that Mexico made the right move for it’s society and I think America and other countries would benefit from taking similar actions.

http://english.aljazeera.net/news/americas/2009/08/200982118315790550.html

[quote]
Friday, August 21, 2009

Mexico relaxes drug possession laws
The law is designed to focus the Mexican authorities’ attention on drug producers [EPA]

Mexico has decriminalised the possession of small amounts of cocaine, heroin and marijuana, as part of an attempt to focus a police crackdown on drug producers and traffickers.

The new law, which also covers LSD and methamphetamine possession, will also offer addicts free treatment, in order to tackle the domestic demand for drugs.

“This [new law] is not legalisation, this is regulating the issue and giving citizens greater legal certainty,” Bernardo Espino del Castillo of the attorney-general’s office, said.[/quote]

What I am suggesting is not shocking, the White House’s drug czar has been looking into this notion.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124225891527617397.html

[quote]WASHINGTON — The Obama administration’s new drug czar says he wants to banish the idea that the U.S. is fighting “a war on drugs,” a move that would underscore a shift favoring treatment over incarceration in trying to reduce illicit drug use.

In his first interview since being confirmed to head the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, Gil Kerlikowske said Wednesday the bellicose analogy was a barrier to dealing with the nation’s drug issues.

“Regardless of how you try to explain to people it’s a ‘war on drugs’ or a ‘war on a product,’ people see a war as a war on them,” he said. “We’re not at war with people in this country.”[/quote]

Not only do I think they need to end the war on drugs, and take steps similar to what Mexico just did, but a lot of these men and women in jail, should be released for the drug possession that they are in jail for.

http://www.november.org/thewall/wall/wall.html

Visit the wall and read the stories. Some do not belong there for the crimes they were placed there for, and the crimes does not suit the time that was given in many cases.

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/abstract/pptmc.htm

American children are suffering,

[quote] * The nation?s prisons held approximately 744,200 fathers and 65,600 mothers at midyear 2007.
* Parents held in the nation?s prisons?52% of state inmates and 63% of federal inmates?reported having an estimated 1,706,600 minor children, accounting for 2.3% of the U.S. resident population under age 18.
* Growth in the number of parents held in state and federal prisons was outpaced by the growth in the nation?s prison population between 1991 and midyear 2007.
[/quote]

My research over the last few years in the Gang Stalking phenomenon, branched out into so many other areas. It allowed me a glimpse into the informant system, which lead to the stories of some of the prisoners who did not choose to become informants, and now I was able to have a deeper look at some of the conditions that some of these prisoners suffer. I understand that things are also grim in these women’s prisons, and after these people come out of the jails and prisons, they are still vulnerable for exploitation in many cases.

Many of these issues I looked into could be traced back to the war on drugs, and it branched out to create a lot of problems for the society it was designed to protect. I no longer believe that the war on drugs is what it was proposed to be, I don’t think it was used for what Americans thought it was going to be used for. Instead it was used to enslave many into becoming informants, and in turn those were used to enslave others.

The ones that did become informants went back into many of those communities and committed worst crimes for which their were no punishments, while still selling drugs withing those communities, and corrupting those communities into the crime havens of today.

Some who choose to not be informants went to jail, which caused over crowding, and made harsh conditions even worst. Within those jails horrific things happened, including the issues of rape, which has been discussed.

Those in jail will someday be released back into these communities and the rest of society, and because many of the psychological issues acquired in prison are not dealt with the community will deal with these issues. Many others in jail learn that rape and violence against others is ok, and that it will not be punished, they even brag about the rapes, the conquests, and they take these attitudes back into these communities, where the general public reside.

The war on drugs, male rape, rapes in prisons period, it’s all part of a cycle, and though you may be lucky enough to escape it, with 1 in 31 in jail, or having passed through the prison system, someone you know might not, be it from going to jail, or encountering one of these individuals released from the jail.

It’s in everyone’s best interest to see that these conditions change, and that the recommendations are implemented as soon as possible. Just my opinion.

August 30, 2009 Posted by | Gang Stalking | , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Male Rape. Part 2

I don’t know what I thought of the issue before I started to research it. I knew it happened in society and in jails. I did to an extent realise that guys were somehow expected to manage it, like it did not happen and why was this expected? Why was there almost a code of silence about this?

What I found is that not only is there a code of silence about this, but the victimized are being ignored, rebuffed, blamed, and much like female rape victims of yesteryear, they are being told in many cases it was their fault. They asked for it, they were secretly gay, real men fight back, their complaints are being covered up by officials. The officials went to make the problems seem like they are not that bad, or that the problem does not really exist the way we think, but my initial research tells me the problem is systemic, and far worst than we realise. Much more vast, and it has far reaching consequences that some are just starting to wake up to.

There are a lot of problems that are happening in the prison system, the rapes were just one aspect with many other branches.

History.

War On Drugs
The story probably began with the war on drugs, mandatory minimum sentences, and people being put away for minor offences, topped with the three strike rule in some states.

This has lead to over crowding of American Prisons. Horrific conditions which are hard to imagine, the country now has 1 in 31 of it’s citizens in jail, probation or parole. 2.1 million Americans are behind bars. America has the reputation for being the country with more citizens behind bars than any other nation. Of those behind bars, the Black or African/American population makes up over 40% or more of that number, even though this group only comprises 14% of the population.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2003/aug/19/usa.garyyounge

I read an article that said black men stand a 1 in 3 chance of going to jail in their life times if this trend continues.
[quote]Black men born in the United States in 2001 will have a one in three chance of going to prison during their lifetime if current trends continue, according to a report by the US justice department.

More than 5.6 million Americans are either in prison or have served time there – and that number will continue to rise, the report shows. [/quote]
Statistics
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incarceration_in_the_United_States
[quote]American prisons and jails held 2,299,116 inmates as of June 30, 2007.[12] One in every 31 American adults, or 7.3 million Americans, are in prison, on parole or probation. Approximately one in every 18 men in the United States is behind bars or being monitored. A significantly greater percentage of the American population is in some form of correctional control even though crime rates have declined by about 25 percent from 1988-2008.[13] 70% of prisoners in the United States are non-whites.[14] In recent decades the U.S. has experienced a surge in its prison population, quadrupling since 1980, partially as a result of mandated sentences that came about during the “war on drugs.” Violent crime and property crime have declined since the early 1990s.[15][/quote]

 
http://lushenabks.com/9780979295300.html

Why are so many black men in Prison?

This book details the author’s personal story of a negligent upbringing in an impoverished community, his subsequent engagement in criminal activity (drug dealing), his incarceration, and his release from prison and experiencing of the crippling social disenfranchisement that comes with being an ex-felon. The author then relates his personal experiences and realizations to the seminal problems within the African-American community, federal government, and criminal justice system that cause his own experiences to be the same experiences of millions of other young Black men.

 
The WALL
Prisoners of the War on Drugs

http://www.november.org/thewall/wall/wall.html

Before I continue I just want to point out that there is ample evidence that much of the drug problem that affected some minority communities were deliberate in nature and scope and were orchestrated by government authorities. Eg. The CIA bringing drugs into these communities, getting people hooked, selling etc. Then get the men and women to become indentured slaves, (snitches for the state) to avoid going to jail. For the ones who chose jail they were given outrageous prison sentences for drug possession or sales.
Gary Webb
 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gary_Webb

http://www.amazon.ca/gp/search?index=books&linkCode=qs&keywords=1888363932

Gary Webb who later died and had his career destroyed documented and who the dark alliance series about the CIA bring drugs into these communities.

Anita Bell a lawyer who tried to prosecute for this was disbarred, fled to Canada, then Israel. She also had her life destroyed for trying to take on the state and expose what was happening.

August 24, 2009 Posted by | Conformity, conspiracies, control, Controlled society, Corruption | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Wall

I have been trying to get this post together for some time now. It’s a quick reminder this holiday season to remember those that are behind the wall.

When I first started to research Gang Stalking I came across the occasional story about people in jail for various reasons, some of the stories left me stunned and shaking my head in disbelief.

See before this type of research I was pretty naive, I thought that if people were in jail for selling drugs they deserved to be there. I assumed that those caught using drugs were in rehabilitation facilities.

I pretty much think drug use is wrong. I am anti-drugs and have been since I was back in school. I was one of those irritating kids telling the friends not to smoke, then not to use drugs, I wasn’t a buzz kill, but I might have crossed the goody line a few times.

Since reading these stories and seeing the true state of things, my opinions and views have undergone some changes. While I am still against drugs and drug use, I think the drug laws are a greater injustice to human kind. They are creating an army of Informants that are loyal to the state, and that would sell their mother if asked to. What I am seeing and reading is more wrong than anything else that I have come across, maybe even Gang Stalking and that’s hard to say.

I don’t believe in legalizing drugs, but I think people should start to look into decriminalizing drugs. The drug war in my opinion is not legitimate. It’s not keeping drugs off the streets. Just ask the CIA who were busy importing drugs into ethnic communities. I use to believe the war on drugs was what it presented itself to be. A war to protect our society from those evil people who wanted to use drugs, get high, and sell drugs. I now see that I was wrong about a lot of this.

This war has been used to enslave the innocent, take away civil rights, allow the police now to use no knock warrants to break into innocent people’s homes, and using an army of Informants to give false testimony to put away innocent people. Also many of those in jail on drug charges are those who did not agree to become informants. They did not play the game and in many cases that is why they are there.

The ones who do play the game. They go back on the streets and they continue to use drugs, to sell drugs, and to set up others, some guilty some not guilty, it’s a disgusting cycle that is being perpetuated and it needs to stop.

I think if society does agree to decriminalize drugs, they could fine drug users the same way they do people who speed in cars. I think they should have areas where people can use some drugs, I don’t think all drugs should be decriminalized, but marijuana would be a good start. I don’t think people should be allowed to smoke this mind altering drug in homes around children, but if people wish to indulge in this, then set up places that they can do so.
The stories that I am coming across lead me to believe that there is a great deal of corruption within the system, and at the heart of that corruption is this Informant system. Take away the need for consistent convictions and you start to get some control and power back. Take away the testimonies of snitches and society starts to get some control back. Take away Informant deals and society would start to get some control back. However the legal system works with and through informants currently. Informants almost have as much or more power than prosecutors and that can only lead to the corruption that is being witnessed in much of these cases, and other areas of society.

Here are story that first tuned me into the fact that all is not right with the war on drug. There are many more like it, but I think this one really opens your eyes. I hope you will keep it in mind this holiday season as you are at home with your families safe and sound.
1. 10 years in jail for selling light bulbs. The forgotten man.

http://atlanta.creativeloafing.com/gyrobase/Content?oid=oid%3A10762&comments=yes
[quote]In the spring of 1994, the Tucker family received lengthy prison sentences — 10 years for Steve, 16 years for his older brother Gary, and 10 years for his brother’s wife, Joanne — without possibility of parole, for the curiously worded federal crime of “conspiracy to manufacture marijuana.”

Yet federal prosecutors never charged them with buying, selling, growing, transporting, smoking or even possessing marijuana. An 18-month DEA investigation had failed to turn up direct evidence connecting the Tuckers to even a single joint.

Instead, they were locked away for selling the lamps, fertilizer and gardening hardware from the small hydroponic supply shop Gary operated on Buford Highway that enabled their customers to grow pot.

In the mid-’90s, the Tucker case became a cause celebrate among libertarian activists and other advocates of marijuana legalization. It served as an oft-cited, cautionary example of the runaway powers of the federal government and the worst excesses of the War on Drugs.[/quote]
[quote]Most of the stuff we were selling, you could buy at Home Depot. We had a legitimate business.”[/quote]
[quote]At the close of the ’70s, 11 states — following the advice of the American Medical Association and even then-President Jimmy Carter — had decriminalized simple possession. In 1981, the first bill to legalize medical-marijuana use was introduced in Congress. Its lead sponsor was a young, conservative Georgia lawmaker named Newt Gingrich.

Under Ronald Reagan, however, the tide swiftly turned. Even while the CIA was secretly helping Nicaraguan Contras smuggle vast amounts of cocaine into the president’s home state of California, the administration was cracking down on domestic pot smokers, pushing for “zero tolerance” drug laws and scolding Americans to “Just Say No.” By the end of the ’80s, even socially progressive Oregon had again outlawed weed.[/quote]
[quote]
So perhaps Gary Tucker shouldn’t have been surprised one day in the early weeks of 1992 when DEA Special Agent Kevin McLaughlin dropped by Southern Lights with an offer its owner wasn’t expected to refuse. The feds would be much obliged, McLaughlin explained, if he’d let them install hidden cameras in the store so they could snoop on his customers. If he didn’t, no effort would be spared in shutting down his 4-year-old business.

The conversation lasted probably all of five minutes, but its outcome would set into motion forces the Tuckers could scarcely imagine.

Gary would later tell his family that when he told McLaughlin to get lost, the agent “said they’d get him somehow,” recalls his mother, Doris Gore.
[b]Still disgusted by the idea of being pressured into being a government spy, Steve has never second-guessed his brother’s response. “This isn’t Nazi Germany,” he says.[/b][/quote]
The last paragraph above is the key reason so many people are ending up in jail, with outrageous sentences. Refusing to play the game. Refusing to become government Snitches/Informants. If he had gone along, he would have sent many others to jail, while preserving himself. This unfortunately is what many others have chosen to do, and that has perpetuated a cycle of horror that is unimaginable.

[quote]One evening in July, the DEA’s McLaughlin, accompanied by partner Mark Hadaway, paid a visit to Jorene Deakle, who worked with Gary as Southern Lights’ store manager, and accused her and her husband of growing pot in their home.

Deakle testified two years later at the Tuckers’ sentencing hearing that the agents had threatened to file charges and seize her house unless she agreed to spy on her employer for them. She said she was frightened into giving them names of Southern Lights customers she thought might be growing weed.

But the agents wouldn’t let up, she testified, until she came with them to point out a house where she knew marijuana was being grown. As they were driving, Deakle told the judge, she picked a house at random so they finally would leave her alone.

The terrified Deakle called the agents several times a week to feed them tidbits of information; the investigation gained momentum. Agents followed customers home, pawed through their garbage, subpoenaed their utility bills and trained sophisticated infrared-imaging devices on their houses to look for concentrated heat sources.

Then the busts began in earnest, as one green thumb after another was caught red-handed. Don Switlick, a convicted drug trafficker, was found growing 114 plants with hydroponic equipment purchased at Southern Lights. Agents discovered a grow room in the Dawsonville home of Thomas Fordham, a high-school friend of Gary’s. And, in September, Chuck Rothermel, who ran a car-customizing shop, was busted for a large crop of immature plants hidden in a nondescript warehouse he was renting in Forsyth County.

Of course, not every raid paid off. In one case, agents searched a startled family’s home, only to discover that the husband was using the incriminating high-watt lamps in his tropical aquarium. In another, the suspect had never heard of the store; he’d been identified through his car, which his girlfriend had borrowed for the day.

Suffering from what Steve describes as a “nervous breakdown,” Deakle mysteriously quit her job. The Tuckers would later find out she had also broken off contact with the DEA.[/quote]
First they went after someone who worked at the store with these brothers, and threatened her till she decided to snitch. That’s where the problem begins. Had she resisted and gone to her employer and advised them what was happening, dozens of people could have avoided being arrested and turned into snitches themselves. Two innocent brothers could have stayed out of jail. Not only that but she admits to pointing out a random house to the police. So some random person is now going to be under investigation for no reason.
[quote]
In December, Gary and Joanne went out to dinner and drinks with a friend, Mark Holmes, who kept steering the rambling, margarita-fueled conversation back to the subject of recreational marijuana use — in large part because he was wearing a wire.[/quote]
[quote]Still, why were prosecutors willing to let admitted pot-growers and convicted drug dealers off easy so they could nail a tax-paying businessman who hadn’t been caught with any grass?

Doris Gore is convinced there was an element of vengeance in the DEA’s pursuit of her sons because they had refused to roll over, to name names, to cop a plea. “They hated Gary because he wouldn’t do what they said,” she says.

She may be on to something. During the trial, Garfield Hammonds, then the Southeast’s top DEA official, announced to the press that Gary was no mere entrepreneur: “He’s a bum, he’s a parasite, he’s a master of deceit, he’s a marijuana czar.” Hammonds, who now sits on the state Board of Pardons and Parole, didn’t return a CL phone call.[/quote]

The corrupt move up the ladder in this system and the innocent go to jail.
[quote]Steve Tucker still believes he and Joanne were charged primarily as added leverage against Gary. When they wouldn’t give him up, the government simply steamrolled over them as well.[/quote]
Because they would not turn Judas and snitch on an innocent man, they were also made to pay the price.
[quote]One former Southern Lights customer, a 66-year-old ex-con we’ll call “Bob” (who spoke to CL on condition he not be named), now says DEA agents tried to coax him into claiming the Tuckers were growing pot at their house, but stopped short of asking him to lie.

“‘You help us and we’ll help you,’ is how they put it,” he explains.

When asked to wear a wire into the store, Bob agreed — then fled the state rather than aid an investigation he believed was intent on “railroading” the business owners.

Even though he eventually testified after police tracked him down, Bob received a four-year sentence, rather than the 18-month stretch he’d initially been offered.[/quote]

This pattern is one that we are consistently seeing. The more culpable being given less time provided they are willing to snitch, lie, and set up the innocent.

[quote]“I was in prison with people who’d swear their own mother was Hitler if it would help them,” he says, shaking his head. “I’ll never have another close friend. I’ll never be able to trust anyone that way, now that I’ve seen what people will do to protect their freedom.”[/quote]

The sad part is after reading these stories, this is not random. Something happens to these people something changes in many of them after they become snitches and what they are willing to do to others to stay out of jail is unimaginable.

[quote]Before the trial began, says Steve: “I was offered 24 months instead of 10 years if I’d testify against Gary. When I said no, they asked me to testify against Joanne. I mean, my brother or my brother’s wife, what’s the difference?”

Even after the jury had returned guilty verdicts against all three Tuckers, the prosecutors offered Steve one last deal: Give up the names of any pot-growers who had escaped their dragnet and get off with only two years.

“I figure I’m a man, I make my own decisions, and I’m not going to tear someone else down to spare myself some time,” he says. “I said, ‘I’ll do my 10 years.’[/quote]

If more people took this stance, society would not be where it is. He refused to lie and sell out innocent people. Thus they gave him ten years.
[quote]Even as they settled into the cell they shared at Talladega Federal Correctional Institute, Gary and Steve’s convictions were being condemned in newsletters and described in magazine articles, discussed at political forums and featured in a CNN special.

The family was the subject of a chapter in the 1998 book Shattered Lives: Portraits From America’s Drug War. Co-author Mikki Norris of El Cerrito, Calif., says the Tuckers’ case was one of the more disturbing she studied.

“It made me very paranoid to think that you could be convicted of completing a drug transaction without even knowing it,” she says.[/quote]
It should have made the country paranoid, and they should have taken a look at the drug policy then, but they didn’t.

[quote]Last December, five days after Steve was released from the halfway house where he’d spent the last few months of his sentence, Gary died of cancer at Emory Hospital.

He had been sick for a nearly a year, but prison officials refused to take his illness seriously until it was too late, his mother says.

“They’d give him an aspirin and send him back to his cell until he’d pass out and then they’d take him to the hospital,” Gore says.

Steve was able to see Gary toward the end, but Joanne — who’d been transferred from a Connecticut woman’s prison to a Macon halfway house — wasn’t allowed to visit her husband the week before he died.

The diagnosis was non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, a cancer closely associated with exposure to Agent Orange, the deadly herbicide used in Vietnam. It would seem Gary’s government had succeeded in killing him after all.[/quote]

After reading this story you have to really wonder if the laws are working, and if they are really putting away who they should be putting away.
[quote]The thing about federal prison that made the biggest impression on Steve was how many inmates were much like himself: small-time, non-violent offenders serving big-time sentences for reasons that made little sense.

“Even if I was guilty, 10 years seems excessive when there were bank robbers who were in there for two or three years, and I got 10 years for selling light bulbs,” he says, his voice rising as if framing a question.

“This drug war forced two little kids to grow up without their dad and my ex-wife to go without child-support for eight years, and for what?” he continues. “I’m not saying I’m above the law, but I know in my heart I’m not the type of person who needed to be in prison.”[/quote]

Small time people in jail with big sentences, while the bigger fishes roam free in society because they agreed to play the game. They go on to have lives, and to be a part of society that is now become corrupt. Wonder if there is a correlation?

[quote]Over the last decade, drug convictions have accounted for more than 80 percent of the growth of the federal prison population, so it’s hardly surprising that, as the drug war swirled outside, amassing new victims, Steve Tucker was essentially forgotten.[/quote]
Wow drug conviction have accounted for 80% of growth in federal prisons? How many people that make up that 80% have decided to play the game and are out free now, or are only going to be serving small sentences?
After reading and researching I draw the only conclusion that I can. The war on drugs was not about what I originally was lead to believe, it’s a part of a much more sinister system that is helping to corrupt society and to enslave society. It’s done so silently, insidiously, under the banner of righteousness, and many of us miss the deeper underlying currents that are going to cost all of society in the end.

I meant to bring you more stories from behind the wall, but this article is already too long. I hope you will take a moment this holiday season to make yourselves become aware of those faces and voices that have been long forgotten behind the wall. Those children that have been left without parent or parents due to this war on drugs, and the impact they will have on society as they grow up without the much needed guidance in many cases.

http://www.november.org/thewall/wall/wall.html

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,461747,00.html

Over 2 million behind bars. Read some of their stories and decide if this war on drugs is really about what you thought it was about.

December 22, 2008 Posted by | Awareness | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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